Strategic Informatics

A blog about the strategic application of technology

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San Antonio HIMSS Chapter Approved by HIMSS Board of Directors

HIMSS (Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society)-1

A few weeks ago the HIMSS National Board of Directors convened and reviewed our application for forming a local chapter in San Antonio.  Texas is the only state to have more than two chapters.  Given the large health care presence in San Antonio I think this chapter is long overdue and a welcome addition to the solid foundation already established in the Alamo city.  This process has been several months in the making with weekly calls occurring among the board of directors.  If interest via our LinkedIn group is any indication we should have a very solid showing.  Stay tuned for more information as we get our first official meeting and speakers lined up.  A revised website is in the works.  In the mean time you can join our LinkedIn group “SA HIMSS” or follow us on Twitter at @sahimms.

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Installing Windows 7 from a USB Drive

The installation for Windows 7 is much faster via USB than CD so I decided to cut as much time off any install as possible by installing the distribution media onto USB rather than the old-school circa 1998 CD-ROM method.  If you want to install Windows 7 via a portable USB key then read on…

NOTICE:  Pay close attention to each step.  Every installation is different so be sure to read through all steps before attempting to format your USB key.  It is easy to type the wrong drive ID when formatting.  I will not be responsible formatting the drive so proceed at your own risk.  If you don’t feel comfortable doing these steps then stop and do the install via DVD instead.

Blah…Blahh…Blahhhh….OK, now that the disclaimer is out of the way let’s dig in…

http://gopaultech.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/04/usbdrive.jpg

Step 1:  Grab a 4GB or larger USB key.  the entire distribution is a little over 2GB so 4GB drives work nicely.

Step 2:  Plug the key into a workstation with a DVD drive that can read the Windows 7 Install media.  I used an existing Windows 7 desktop but you can also use a Vista/XP workstation as well.

Step 3:  Open a command prompt.  If using Vista be sure to open the command prompt as administrator by right clicking on the command prompt icon and selecting “Run as Administrator”

Step 4: Type the following into the command prompt window

  • diskpart
  • listdisk (The disk number for my USB key was 1, be sure to identify the size to get the correct disk ID.  This is important)
  • select disk 1 (you are about to format the disk so be sure you get the correct disk ID...See above step)
  • clean
  • create partition primary
  • select partion 1 (mine was 1.  be sure to put your ID here instead!)
  • active
  • format fs=NTFS
  • assign
  • exit

Step 5:  Insert the Windows 7 disk into the same workstation you used to format the USB key

Step 6:  In the same command prompt window navigate to the boot directory on the DVD drive where the Windows 7 Install disk is located

Step 7:  To make the drive bootable enter the following command

  • bootsect /nt60 E: (Where E: is the drive letter assigned after you typed the assign command above)

Step 8:  With the USB key formatted and bootable you can now copy all the files from the Windows 7 install DVD onto the USB Key

When you boot your target PC be sure to boot via the USB option in your boot priority.  Some workstations have a key you can press during intial startup to change the boot drive.

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Installing Windows 7 on a Mac OSX Bootcamp Partition


So I’ve been running Windows 7 since early September when the release to production copy was opened up for MSDN subscribers.  I can honestly attest that this is by far the best relese of Windows to come out of Redmond to-date.  The ugly duckling known as Vista has shed its skin and what has emerged is an efficient and capable operating system that performs well on relatively underpowered hardware.  I’ve created a few posts in the past that outline how to install Vista on a MacbookPro via bootcamp and also how to install at 500GB hard drive and maintain both partitions.  I’ve done all of this including the initial Leopard upgrade from Tiger without a total rebuild.  This is an amazing feat considering the number of trips to Apples Genius Bar desk to replace faulty video controllers for my now aging and out of warrantee Macbook Pro.  So I decided since I had been testing Windows 7 for a while now on a Dell XT and XT2 that I would tempt fate and perform an upgrade to the Bootcamp partition currently running Vista.  The other installations of Windows 7 on Intel hardware have been clean installs so this would be my first upgrade.  An upgrade, mind you, that has a significant amount of software installed. 

The process was actually fairly straight forward but I thought I would share none-the-less since the how-to posts seem to get the most attention. 

Step 1:  From either OS X or Windows open up the bootcamp manager and select the Windows partition. 

 bootcamp

Step 2:  Reboot to ensure that the default setting loads windows

Step 3:  Insert USB or Windows 7 CD into drive (I’ll post how to create a USB version of the Windows 7 Install Disk in a separate post)

Step 4:  Run the setup.exe from the Auto Run dialog box or manually via Windows Explorer.   From the initial setup dialog box run the compatibility testing tool (not shown in the image below) to ensure you meet all the minimum requirements and your software is compatible.  I had an issue with Windows OneCare to which I had to uninstall prior to installing.  Ironically it states there is an issue with the bootcamp software loaded on the Vista OS along with iTunes.   I proceeded none-the-less with the installation by clicking Next>after the check was complete.

windows7setup

Step 5: Setup of the OS is about as straight forward as it can possibly get.  Nothing special to do here just follow the instructions for an upgrade and enter in your key when prompted.

Step 6:  You will eventually reboot your system at which time you get the initial boot screen for windows indicating which Windows OS you want to boot into.  Keep the default Windows or Windows 7 (not Vista) and proceed with allowing setup to configure your system.

Step 7 (Optional):  Open up bootcamp setup and configure your default boot OS.  Either Windows or OS X

The setup depending on the software you have installed will take quite a while but for the most part it is a hands-off process.  Enjoy…