Why my next PC will be a Mac

The new features in the upcoming release of Apple’s Leopard is just one of the many reasons why my next PC will be a Mac. Coupled with a lightning fast Intel processor that supports virtualization of my other most used OS’s Windows Vista and Linux there is little reason for me not to take advantage of the native Unix capabilities built into OS X.

Apple has been making some very good strategic decision with respects to their entire line of products and software. Steve was right on the money when he said if you are going to make top quality software then you must make the hardware. Microsoft has steadily, and mush to my dismay, driven their core OS in a direction that makes it difficult to be all things to all people. Microsoft has a daunting challenge to support of the vast amounts of legacy hardware in the PC market making each subsequent OS release more and more challenging to support much less upgrade. Having taken my three year old laptop which is a pretty capable beast and gotten beat up by lack of support for the most basic of things has almost driven me to the edge. Our company’s infrastructure is driven entirely by Linux based servers so each day that passes or years between expected OS releases makes it more appealing to search for what other options are out there. The worker bees at Apple offer come compelling reasons to switch with their next OS iteration.

OS X based on BSD is a very capable and flexible OS. For starters you don’t have five flavors of workstation OS’s to choose from you just have one tweaked slightly for server based operations or workstation class performance. You also have solid releases with useful features such as the historical backup utility “Time Machine”. I’ve been a fan of multiple desktops for years on the Linux desktop and glad to see it take on some useful functionality on the Mac OSX platform with “Spaces”. Hands down though Compbiz fusion on Linux is a clear winner on the OS eye candy front. The clear winner for me and reason why I will be making a switch with my next PC purchase is Apple’s choice to use Intel processors with support for native virtualization. The ability to leverage OS X’s native Unix environment to manage my servers or switch between Windows and Linux at will without a significant loss in speed using the dual core processors built into the latest Mac’s is wonderful. We live in a primarly Windows world so leveraging Apples’ bootcamp to boot natively into OSX or Windows is perfect for me. The limited hardware on the Macs, which is already top notch, means that Apple can focus on developing drivers that work with the underlying OS and not rely on 16 different vendors to release updated drivers for your workstation. OEM’s such as HP and Dell have gotten a lot better about how frequently they update their products but it is certainly not as seamless as Apple makes it. Apple decision to open boot camp support to virtualization vendors Paralle’s and VMWare was pure genius. Not only can I boot natively into Windows or OS X but I can run my Windows partition as a virtual machine in OSX as needed without having to reboot or store files in a specific shared partition. Brilliant!!!!!